UCL positronium spectroscopy beamline (the first two years)

The UCL Ps spectroscopy positron beamline began producing low-energy positrons almost two years ago, and it has since become slightly longer and somewhat more sophisticated. Though it’s not the most complex scientific machine in the world (compared to, e.g., the LHC) we still find regular use for a 3D depiction of it.  Our model is essentially a cartoon. Typically we use it to create (fairly) accurate schematics that help us to convey the configuration of our equipment at conferences or in publications.

UCL_positron_trap

The snap shot above shows the three main components of the beamline, namely the positron source (left), Surko trap (centre, cross-section), and Ps laser-spectroscopy region (right).  The 3D model is built from simplified forms of the various vacuum chambers and pumps, magnetic coils, and detectors.  And it shows where these all are in relation to one another.  The 45° angled line is being used right now for Rydberg Ps time-of-flight measurements.  The source and trap are based on the design developed by Rod Greaves and Jeremey Moxom of First Point Scientific Inc. (unfortunately now defunct).  You can read about the details of their design in this article.

To allow you to take a closer look we have created a 3D pdf file that you can download here * (licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License). Be aware we use this for illustration/ communication purposes and it is not an accurate technical model. Nonetheless, using this you can pan, zoom, and rotate around our virtual lab to your heart’s content! No need for 3D glasses, though you will need a recent copy of Adobe reader,  (the interactive features probably won’t work in your web browser).

*MD5 checksum c6028573596c9511d9ba0450cd2caa05

And here’s how the lab looks in real life,

beamline_2016_3

 

 

 

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